DEDICATED IN LOVING MEMORY OF ISAAC GAMEL ז''ל BY HIS FAMILY

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Length: 40 minutes
When Pinchas was sensitive to the tremendous chilul Hashem (desecration of G-d’s name), it removed Hashem’s anger. Pinchas reacted in the way that Hashem himself would have, which creates tremendous connection and closeness in a relationship. We are called upon to feel for the honor of Hashem, rather than only worrying about our own pain and honor. During the three weeks, when we mourn for the loss of the Beis Hamikdash, we worry about the lack of knowledge of Hashem in the world, rather than focusing on our own troubles. This creates a strong connection with Hashem, which will hopefully be revealed in its true strength with the coming of Moshiach, speedily in our days.
Length: 40 minutes
The Jewish people’s purity of lineage is recounted soon before entering Eretz Yisrael. These two ideas—family purity and Eretz Yisroel—must go hand-in-hand, and are juxtaposed in the second bracha of Birchas Hamazon. The sanctity of Bris Milah as an integral part of family purity is an expression of our uniqueness. This is expressed in the beginning of the Parshas Pinchas as a reward for his zealousness in safeguarding the holiness of Bnei Yisroel in these areas.
Length: 56 minutes
In the fourth aliyah of Parshas Pinchas, Moshe speaks to Hashem regarding the appointment of Yehoshua as the next leader. This transition is significant on many levels. This takes place right after the incident with the daughters of Tzelafchad, when Hashem declares that they are completely right in their interpretation of the Torah. In this new stage, it is important for Yehoshua, as the leader of Bnei Yisroel, to listen to what they say and to understand the value of voice of the people, even as they will be unable to hear the voice of Hashem as clearly as before.
Length: 57 minutes
The fifth aliya of Parshas Pinchas is the most read section of the Torah. It speaks of the extra korbanos brought on shabbos, yom tov and rosh chodesh. When discussing the korbanos brought on rosh chodesh, it says to bring a sin offering to Hashem. We explore here the meaning of bringing a sin offering for Hashem, and analyze the connection to Rosh Chodesh. Significantly, this parsha is read during the beginning of the period of the three weeks. The Jewish people are like the moon, in a constant state of cycle, times of ‘up’ and ‘down’. Ultimately, we pray for the day where the moon will absorb the sun’s light completely, and there will be no more cycle; rather, there will be constant and complete connection.
Length: 1 hour
The seventh aliyah in Parshas Pinchas discusses the various korbanos brought on Succos. We read this parsha at the beginning of the three weeks, and here we explore the connection between Succos and Tisha b’Av. Succos was a time of bringing korbanos on behalf of the nations of the world, while Tisha B’Av is when the Beis Hamikdash was destroyed by the nations of the world. Succos is the third in two different holiday series – Pesach/Shavuos/Succos and Rosh Hashana/Yom Kippur/Succos, thus representing the Jews special relationship with Hashem as part of the whole world recognizing Hashem. We pray for the day that the Jews can have internal peace and therefore be able to bring greater peace and recognition of G-d into the world.
Length: 40 minutes
Hashem knew that in order for the Jewish people to survive, the breaking of the luchos was critical. The story of the three weeks is Hashem distancing from us so that we would have a future. He takes out His wrath on “sticks and stones” because He wants us to go forward with an alternative approach of His love for us.
Length: 53 minutes
Pinchas instilled a sense of mission within the Jewish people and the ability to react to the call of duty and stand up for what is right. Often, Hashem is waiting for us to take the initiative. Instinctively, we become aware of a moral injustice that demands an immediate and dramatic response. These instincts- whether a drive to do chessed or the abhorrence of evil- are to be cultivated and appreciated.
Length: 1 hour
In Parshas Pinchas, many different korbanos are enumerated for the different holidays. Even though our tefillos nowadays are but a shadow of what our service once was, we confidently ask Hashem to accept our tefillos as a replacement for the “meeting point” that the korbanos functioned as. It is in the bracha of Retzei that we add Yaaleh V’yavoh on holidays, another aspect of “meeting” with Hashem. Tisha B’Av is an unfulfilled meeting point, and we daven that the potential in that day will soon be restored.
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